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PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 9:10 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 26, 2009 2:56 am
Posts: 292
bigmoog wrote:
...

3 AM AT THE BORDER OF THE MARSH FROM OKEFENOKEE

:D


I believe this is taken from the Beaver & Krause album folks ... and a wonderful compliment it is! Totally in keeping with the titles and such.

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Last edited by Hipgnosis on Tue Feb 04, 2014 8:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 9:27 pm 
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Hi,

"Force Majeure" for me, is a nice title, and I think it is an "editorial" of sorts, in a funny sort of way.

At that time, everyone was a keyboard artist and everyone was great and better and more popular than Tangerine Dream. Keyboard 1 had 10 artists! Keyboard 2 had 10 artists! Keyboard 69 had 10 artists! Keyboard 999 had 10 artists! And radio and record stores would play someone else.

While it is good that it shows new and different music, it was a bit sad, that all of a sudden 2nd rate keyboard players get more attention than TD deserved.

In the end, we know whose force was "majeure" and whose force withered away to dust!

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 01, 2014 12:27 pm 
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Posts: 98
All of the tracks from Melrose are pretty literal, but I always wondered if "Three Bikes In The Sky" perhaps meant some kind of trippy vision where Edgar Froese, Paul Haslinger & Jerome Froese (the current line-up at the time the album was released) were riding their bicycles in some sort of ET fashion. I had seen the "Dolls In The Shadow" video before I discovered the actual album. The three of them appear there, riding their bikes on the ground (that's also on the album cover), so when I saw the title I'm referring to I immediately pictured that image I talked about: Edgar, Jerome and Paul riding their bikes like ET, even with the moon on the horizon and everything. Just a guess, I don't know if it actually means that.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 2:16 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 04, 2010 2:16 pm
Posts: 50
I've been studying Zen Buddhist philosophy on a personal level these past few months, and I'm really indebted to Edgar for piquing my interest in the subject over time. I was listening to "Cool At Heart" from Melrose an hour ago, and I couldn't help but marvel at how its soothing melody helps me return to the present moment. A few minutes later, something on Google caught my eye. Unless I'm mistaken, Edgar named the track using an English translation of a Buddhist text, the Sudatta Sutta:

Quote:
Always indeed he sleeps well,
The Brahmin who is fully quenched,
Who does not cling to sensual pleasures,
Cool at heart, without acquisitions.


"Cool At Heart" was already a personal favorite of mine, so now it's just been elevated to a whole new level!

There are potentially many other track titles that reference Buddhist subject matter. The Atomic Seasons series has always been rather obvious, so I tend to look elsewhere. I have a feeling that "Turning Off The Wheel" from Optical Race was originally intended to read "Turning Of The Wheel" (as a couple of fans have previously pointed out). In Buddhist circles, the so-called turning of the dharma wheel refers to the incremental arrival of teachings that allow sentient beings to overcome suffering. Since a few of us agree that the track was largely written by Edgar, this seems feasible to me. And finally, there is "Passing All Signs" from Views From A Red Train. I didn't know what to make of the meaning for the longest time, but I now have a working theory. The Diamond Sutra talks a great deal about signs, which are essentially illusory phenomena in the world that delude and ensnare people on a regular basis. The text advocates seeing beyond these delusions, thereby literally "passing all signs" (so to speak). The track's otherworldly atmosphere seems to support this notion by depicting a sort of higher consciousness where all sensory deceptions fall away. You're free to disagree with these interpretations, but I've personally been having fun doing this detective work. Edgar may be gone, but the impressions he left are truly profound and deeply appreciated.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 21, 2016 9:53 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 6:28 pm
Posts: 2279
PurpleTwilight wrote:
I've been studying Zen Buddhist philosophy on a personal level these past few months, and I'm really indebted to Edgar for piquing my interest in the subject over time. I was listening to "Cool At Heart" from Melrose an hour ago, and I couldn't help but marvel at how its soothing melody helps me return to the present moment. A few minutes later, something on Google caught my eye. Unless I'm mistaken, Edgar named the track using an English translation of a Buddhist text, the Sudatta Sutta:

Quote:
Always indeed he sleeps well,
The Brahmin who is fully quenched,
Who does not cling to sensual pleasures,
Cool at heart, without acquisitions.


"Cool At Heart" was already a personal favorite of mine, so now it's just been elevated to a whole new level!

There are potentially many other track titles that reference Buddhist subject matter. The Atomic Seasons series has always been rather obvious, so I tend to look elsewhere. I have a feeling that "Turning Off The Wheel" from Optical Race was originally intended to read "Turning Of The Wheel" (as a couple of fans have previously pointed out). In Buddhist circles, the so-called turning of the dharma wheel refers to the incremental arrival of teachings that allow sentient beings to overcome suffering. Since a few of us agree that the track was largely written by Edgar, this seems feasible to me. And finally, there is "Passing All Signs" from Views From A Red Train. I didn't know what to make of the meaning for the longest time, but I now have a working theory. The Diamond Sutra talks a great deal about signs, which are essentially illusory phenomena in the world that delude and ensnare people on a regular basis. The text advocates seeing beyond these delusions, thereby literally "passing all signs" (so to speak). The track's otherworldly atmosphere seems to support this notion by depicting a sort of higher consciousness where all sensory deceptions fall away. You're free to disagree with these interpretations, but I've personally been having fun doing this detective work. Edgar may be gone, but the impressions he left are truly profound and deeply appreciated.


To me, Passing All Signs means that the train is non-stop so does not call at any stations :)


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